Tag Archives: Hymn

“Sthuthippin sthuthippin Yesudevane” – Unchanged final hymn from the first Maramon Convention in 1895 (See Videos)

The Hymn Sthuthippin sthuthippin Yesudevane, Halleluiyah paadi sthuthippeen sthuthippen yesudevane” written by Rev. Yusthus Joseph (Vidhuwan Kutty Achen) (1835-1887) is sung by the complete congregation at the close of the final meeting of each year’s convention. This may be a world record for the same hymn being sung every year at the same time since the year 1895.

Rev. Yusthus Joseph (Vidhuwan Kutty Achen) (1835-1887) has written 26 out of the total 427 hymns in the Kristeeya Keerthanangal (hymn book used by the Mar Thoma Syrian Church).

Kristeeya Keerththanangal

Kristeeya Keerthanangal

According to the Late Metropolitan Most. Rev. Dr. Juhanon Mar Thoma, Vidhuwan Kutty Achen had a vital role in the Revival movement of the Mar Thoma Church “The spiritual revival started by an unknown preacher Mathai Upadesi and carried on by Rev. Yusthus Joseph (Vidhuwan Kutty), a famous scholar and musician and a Brahmin convert, had its influence throughout Central Travancore. – “Christianity in India and a brief history of the Mar Thoma Syrian Church” by Most. Rev. Juhanon Mar Thoma.

Read more about Rev. Yusthus Joseph (Vidhuwan Kutty Achen) in our free pdf ebook.
https://nalloorlibrary.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/ebook-vidhuwan-kutty-achen.pdf

The original composition by in Carnatic music style is still performed by classical singers.

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21 May, 1921: V. Nagel, author of “Samayamaam radhaththil” passes away. (Rare Photos)

Volbrecht Nagel

21 May, 1921: V. Nagel, author of “Samayamaam radhaththil” passes away. Born in Germany on 3 November, 1867, he came to India in 1893, as a missionary. Along with his wife Harriet, he worked in Kunnamkulam, North Paravur, Trichur and Kumbanadu.

He has written more than 100 hymns in Malayalam that is still sung by all denominations and churches in Kerala.

Hymns written by him in the Kristheeya Keerththanangal (Hymn Book of the Mar Thoma Syrian Church) are – Nos. 57, 144(135), 153(143), 155(145), 203(392), 214(199), 223(208), 238(216), 239(217), 242(220), 244(222), 287, 294(280), 298(284), 300, 301, 325(319), 374(257), 380(260), 382(262), 390(269), 402(294) ,405(353) and 411(354).

The song has been translated into 17 languages though it was originally written in Malayalam and even incorporated in a film.The song depicts the journey of ones life…but it is mistakenly interpreted as many as just a funeral song…but actually its just a song about ones journey from birth …to home ie heaven.

Read below about the great hym writer Volbrecht Nagel from an account by his son Karl Heinrich Nagel.

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The Story of Volbrecht Nagel

By his son, Karl Heinrich Nagel

This account of Volbrecht Nagel was found in an exercise book belonging to Karl Heinrich Nagel and was probably written in the early 1980s when Karl was in his 70s, was ill and his memory was failing. It has been written up by Karl’s daughter, Pauline Munns. February 2007

Volbrecht Nagel

Volbrecht Nagel was born to Heinrich Peter Nagel and Elisabeth May Nagel on the 3rd November 1867 in the village of Stammheim, Hessen, Germany. He was baptised on November 17th in the Lutheran church and Volbrecht Nagel II was his godfather. He appears to have lost his parents at a young age and to have been taken over by a Mr and Mrs Bindewald, who educated him. He was brought up according to the Lutheran Church. He appears to have been ordained as a Pastor at the early age of 20 and to have been sent as a Lutheran missionary to Cannanore, Malaba (now Kerala State). He served the Lutheran Church until about 1892 when he left them owing to doctrinal differences. He had no money at the time and began to walk barefoot, trusting the Lord to lead him to the place where he could start a work for Him.

Volbrecht Nagel

Harriet Sabina Mitchell Nagel

Eventually he came to a place called Kunnamkulum, in Cochin State, where he met a small group of Christians, who called themselves Brethren, and worshipped God in a simple manner without a pastor. He believed that this was where the Lord would have him work for the time being. It was while he was here, building up the church, that he met and married Harriet Mitchell, on 1st April 1896, who gave him his first two sons, Samuel Frederick (1.1.1898) and Theodore Ernst (10.3.1899).

When he saw that the believers were well established and capable of carrying on by themselves, he moved with his wife and two sons, to a place called PARUR, also in Cochin State, and began a work for the Lord there. Here his third son, Gotlob Volbrecht was born on 8.8.1900 and his first daughter Olive Margaret on 31.12.1901. About this time my mother decided that she should take a nurse’s training so that she may be more qualified to work as a missionary’s wife, so she went to Madras and qualified in a short midwifery course, and returned to the family at Parur.

Considering that the believers were well established in the faith, my father moved, with his family, to British Cochin. Here his fourth son, Karl Heinrich was born on 17.11 1905. Two [other]children were also born, Wilfried Adolf and Elsa Hope but they died as infants and were buried in Hosur Road cemetery, Bangalore.

The Volbrecht Nagel Family
With Harriet’s sister, Josephine Mitchell

Seeing that the work was well established at British Cochin, my father decided to move, with his family to Trichur in Cochin State. The time had now come for the education of his children, and as there were no English schools in Trichur, he made arrangements for the four older children to go to Bangalore for their education. I was sent to school in Bangalore in January 1914. During these years my father developed the work at Trichur. Besides the assembly work, he opened a girls’ orphanage, which still flourishes.

As my brother Samuel and Theodore’s futures had now to be considered, my father took them to London, presumably about March 1914, to apprentice them there as engineers. That was the last his three younger children saw of him. On his way to London he called at Stammheim with my brothers for a few days. After seeing that they were settled in London, he went to the Bible School at Berlin, intending to visit his relatives once more before returning to India. Unfortunately for him, World War 1 broke out, and, being a German, he was not allowed to return to India. The problem now arose of joining the German army, which was compulsory, a thing he said he would never do, being a Christian. He prayed about the matter and asked the Lord to open the way for him to cross over into Switzerland, which was neutral. He made the attempt one night, and the Lord undertook by making the frontier guards very sleepy, so that they carelessly examined his passport and allowed him through.

Volbrecht Nagel

When the war ceased in November 1918 my father sought permission to return to India but was refused. He therefore went back to the Bible School. (The Bible School had moved [from Berlin] to Wiedenest. He obtained a position on the staff until about February 1921 when he had a stroke of apoplexy. They cabled to my mother in India and she left immediately. Ironically the English government gave him permission to return to India just then but it was too late. My mother nursed him until he passed away on May 21st, 1921. He was buried in the cemetery adjoining the Bible School. My brothers Samuel and Theodore went from England to attend his funeral. Mr and Mrs Bindewald,who brought him up also attended because, they said, he was the means of their salvation.

A Mr. Kocher, a missionary from India, also attended as he was in charge of a girls’ orphanage at Irinjalakuda, very close to Trichur, during my father’s time there. After the funeral my mother visited his relatives at Stammheim and stayed with them for a short while before returning to India.

Ted, Harriet, and Sam @ Volbrecht’s funeral

Reproduced with kind permission from https://revisitingthepast.wordpress.com/2010/07/24/the-story-of-volbrecht-nagel/

15 November, 1731: Birth of William Cowper (1731-1800) author of “Immanuel than chankathil…”

William_Cowper by Lemuel Francis Abbott (wikipedia)

William_Cowper by Lemuel Francis Abbott (wikipedia)

15 November, 1731: Birth of William Cowper (1731-1800) author of the Hymn ‘There is a fountain filled with blood’ (‘Immanuel than chankathil…’ no.147 (138) in the Mar Thoma Church Hymn book Kristheeya Keerththanangal). The words of this hymn are immortal and will be sung as long as there are sinners upon this earth.

Cowper’s well known hymns:

  • Jesus! where’er thy people meet
  • The Spirit breathes upon the word
  • There is a fountain, filled with blood
  • Hark! my soul! it is the Lord
  • To Jesus, the Crown of my hope
  • Far from the world, O Lord! I flee
  • My Lord! how full of sweet content (1782 translation)
  • What various hindrances we meet
  • Oh! for a closer walk with God
  • When darkness long has veiled my mind
  • Tis my happiness below
  • O Lord! in sorrow I resign (1782 translation)
  • O Lord! my best desire fulfill
  • There is a safe and secret place
  • God of my life! to thee I call

15 May, 1857: Birth of Hymn writer Rev. T. Koshy (Aatmopakari Achen)

Kristeeya Keerththanangal

           Kristeeya Keerththanangal

15 May, 1857: Birth of Rev. Thomas Koshy (Aatmopakari Achen), author of Hymn “Ennullil ennum vasichchiduvan”. Born as a member of the Mukkadavu family of Kallada, he became a priest in 1896. He was a gifted artist, hymn writer and publisher. He was a speaker of the Maramon Convention for many years.

Hymn Nos. 10(9), 37(35), 190(179), 216(201), 20(205), 221(206), 246(224), 297(283), 316(311), 344, and 352 in the Hymn Book Kristheeya Kerthanagal are written by him.

Read more in our Short Biographies:  Rev. Thomas Koshy (Aatmopakari Achen) (Free PDF)

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Rare 1986 Documentary on the Malankara Mar Thoma Syrian Church

A Must Watch Special Documentary with rare footage on the Malankara Mar Thoma Syrian Church – (English/Malayalam) produced in 1986. It offers a peek into the history, rich culture and heritage of the Mar Thoma Syrian Church.

A Malaysian presentation in conjunction with the 150th Anniversary of the REFORMATION in the Malankara Mar Thoma Syrian Church. (Please watch and share).

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Pages from History: 4 September, 1847: Henry Francis pens Hymn ‘Abide with me’

4 September, 1847: Henry Francis Lyte (1793-1847) writes the Hymn “Abide with me” (Malayalam – Koode paarkka neram vaikkunnitha, No.8 (7) in Kristheeya Keerththanagal). Lyte wrote this hymn at the end of his life, just two months before he died. The text for this Hymn was taken from Luke’s Gospel Ch.24 v. 29 “Abide with us; for it is toward evening, and the day is far spent”.

Henry Francis Lyte

Henry Francis Lyte

Pages from History: Birth of Hymn writer Fanny Crosby (1820)

24 March, 1820: Birth of Hymn writer Fanny Crosby. Frances Jane Crosby commonly known as Fanny Crosby, was an American lyricist best known for her Protestant Christian hymns. She was one of the most prolific hymnists in history, writing over 8,000 hymns despite becoming blind after birth. She is also known for her preaching and speaking. During her lifetime Fanny Crosby was one of the best known women in the States.

To this day, the vast majority of American hymnals contain her work. Some of her best known songs include “Blessed Assurance”  “Jesus Is Tenderly Calling You Home” “Praise Him, Praise Him” and “To God be the Glory”. Since some publishers were hesitant to have so many hymns by one person in their hymnals, Crosby used nearly 100 different pseudonyms during her career.

Hymn writer Fanny Crosby

Hymn writer Fanny Crosby