Pages from History : Death of Charles Wesley (1788)

29 March, 1788: Death of Charles Wesley (b.18 Dec.1707). Charles Wesley was a leader of the Methodist movement and the younger brother of John Wesley.

Despite their closeness, Charles and his brother did not always agree on questions relating to their beliefs. In particular, Charles was strongly opposed to the idea of a breach with the Church of England into which they had been ordained.

Charles Wesley is chiefly remembered for the many hymns he wrote. In the course of his career, Charles Wesley published the words of over five and a half thousand hymns, writing the words for a further two thousand, many of which are still popular.

He was said to have averaged 10 poetic lines a day for 50 years. He wrote 8,989 hymns. He composed some of the most memorable and lasting hymns of the church: “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing,” “And Can It Be,” “O for a Thousand Tongues to Sing,” “Love Divine, All Loves Excelling,” “Jesus, Lover of My Soul,” “Christ the Lord Is Risen Today,” “Soldiers of Christ, Arise,” and “Rejoice! the Lord Is King!” (http://www.christianitytoday.com)

Charles Wesley preaching, by William Gush.

Charles Wesley preaching, by William Gush.

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